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Foster Care

Treatment Foster Care Oregon

Supports and treats children ages seven through eleven with significant mental health and behavioral challenges.

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Treatment Foster Care Oregon (TCFO) serves children ages seven through eleven with significant mental health and behavioral challenges, with a focus on long-term wellbeing and stability of the child and the reunification caregiver.

This program provides a level of intensity similar to residential treatment in a more natural setting, and is considered a step-down from residential treatment, which allows the family system to practice interventions in structured settings while also having an increase in visits. Services are offered through an individualized treatment plan that encompasses an interdisciplinary team that meets weekly with the foster care providers as well as the child-identified reunification caregiver.

The two main goals of TFCO are to create opportunities for youth to successfully live in a family setting and to simultaneously help parents (or other long-term family resource) provide effective parenting. 

TFCO focuses on five key areas:

  1. A consistent, reinforcing environment with mentoring and encouragement
  2. Daily structure with clear expectations and specific consequences
  3. A high level of youth supervision
  4. Limited access to problem peers along with access to prosocial peers
  5. An environment that supports daily school attendance and homework completion

(For more information about the TFCO program visit: https://www.tfcoregon.com”). 

Throughout treatment, interventions are used across settings to prevent future behaviors that cause the child to navigate away from typical developmental trajectory.   

Make a Referral

Children are referred to the program by county social services within the metro area.

Learn More

Talk to our Foster Care Team to learn more today.

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